Conservation Ethics


Conservation Ethics



In today's environmentally conscious society, businesses are finding the need to redefine their approach to ethical practices. One such aspect of ethics that is continuing to expand is within the field of conservation ethics.


Alan Marshall's conservation ethics looks only at the worth of the environment in terms of its utility or usefulness to humans. It is the opposite of deep ecology, hence is often referred to as shallow ecology, and argues for the preservation of the environment on the basis that it has extrinsic value – instrumental to the welfare of human beings.


Therefore according to Marshall, conservation is a means to an end and purely concerned with mankind and intergenerational considerations. It could be argued that it is this ethic that formed the underlying arguments proposed by Governments at the Kyoto summit in 1997 and three agreements reached in Rio in 1992.




Tags: Conservation Ethics, Alan Marshall, Kyoto summit, Ethics of Conservation, 2009 Conservation Ethics, 2009 Ethics